Using CPAP During the Day

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Using CPAP During the Day

Postby Guest » Tue Sep 19, 2006 9:19 pm

My husband was diagnosed with severe sleep apnea over two years ago and is non compliant with his cpap. He told me yesterday that he has been using the machine during the day while away for 30-60 minutes to "get him more oxygen". He thinks it is helpful. Has anyone heard of this before.
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Postby Linda » Wed Sep 20, 2006 12:00 am

What do you mean he uses it "while away"? Do you mean he uses it for daytime naps?

I don't know why he would do that and not use it at night. If he uses it for some daytime naps, yes it may help -- a little.
But it won't eliminate his apneas. And cpap isn't delivering MORE oxygen. It's merely adding pressure to the air we breath, the pressure keeping our airways open. In a sense it does add oxygen, because untreated sleep can (not always) result in lower oxygen levels in the body. But to continue NOT using it at night is the same is not using it all. I hope he reconsiders and becomes compliant.

Feel free to post back and describe more, such as why he isn't compliant -- there can be many reasons, many involve the mask.


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Re: Using CPAP During the Day

Postby Daniel » Wed Sep 20, 2006 4:02 am

Guest wrote:My husband was diagnosed with severe sleep apnea over two years ago and is non compliant with his cpap. He told me yesterday that he has been using the machine during the day while away for 30-60 minutes to "get him more oxygen". He thinks it is helpful. Has anyone heard of this before.


Hi,

Using cpap for 30/60 minutes per day WHILE SLEEPING will help his OSA for the 30/60 minutes that he uses it, no more. If he is awake it is of no benefit as OSA occurs while sleeping only.

Because of his non compliance over the last 2 years, his apnoea has probably deteriorated further and there may be damage to some of the major organs in his body.

In short..........its not really helpful.

Daniel.
The untreated Sleep Apnoea sufferer died quietly in his sleep..
Unlike his three passengers who died screaming !


The first 40 years of childhood are by far the hardest
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More on my husband

Postby Guest » Wed Sep 20, 2006 5:52 pm

Sorry for the typo earlier. He uses the CPAP while awake only for 30-60 minutes. Claims it helps him get more oxygen and makes him feel better. He does not use it when sleeping at all. It actually has been sitting in the closet for the last 18 months after it set on the side table of our bed room for the preceeding six months (collecting dust).
I have encouraged him to go back and have it readjusted and/or see the sleep specialist but he refuses to do so. I have printed numerous posts from this website but if he does read them I don't think it is making an impact.

In the last two years he has gained a considerable amount of weight. He now occasionally has swelling in his legs. He claims it is related to his sleep and indicates it is similar to the way my fingers may swell in the summer time from heat. (Which I have never said I had problems with that ). But, that is just another excuse. In the past he was incontinent at night but denied it indicating it was one of our children peeing on the chair. But they wore diapers at the time and never had wet pjs. Where as I would find his clothes in the dryer after he washed them. Now I am concerned that he may be impotent as his lack of interest is unusual for him.

I know you don't need to hear all this but sometimes it helps to vent.
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Re: More on my husband

Postby Daniel » Wed Sep 20, 2006 6:42 pm

Guest wrote:Sorry for the typo earlier. He uses the CPAP while awake only for 30-60 minutes. Claims it helps him get more oxygen and makes him feel better. He does not use it when sleeping at all. It actually has been sitting in the closet for the last 18 months after it set on the side table of our bed room for the preceeding six months (collecting dust).
I have encouraged him to go back and have it readjusted and/or see the sleep specialist but he refuses to do so. I have printed numerous posts from this website but if he does read them I don't think it is making an impact.

In the last two years he has gained a considerable amount of weight. He now occasionally has swelling in his legs. He claims it is related to his sleep and indicates it is similar to the way my fingers may swell in the summer time from heat. (Which I have never said I had problems with that ). But, that is just another excuse. In the past he was incontinent at night but denied it indicating it was one of our children peeing on the chair. But they wore diapers at the time and never had wet pjs. Where as I would find his clothes in the dryer after he washed them. Now I am concerned that he may be impotent as his lack of interest is unusual for him.

I know you don't need to hear all this but sometimes it helps to vent.


Using cpap while awake is of no benefit. If he is feeling better, it's probably just a 'buzz' from using it.

Having gained weight, in addition to not using cpap, his condition has probably deteriorated further. Swelling in the legs is known as 'odema'. I believe (subject to correction) that it is a build up of fluids and is usually a sign of cardiac problems or in some cases renal problems. Both cardiac and renal problems are strongly linked to untreated apnoea. Might even be the start of CHF (congestive heart failure).

Incontinence could be related to other problems, but a disorder known as 'nocturia' is linked to untreated apnoea. This involves a considerable number of visits to the bathroom during the night...........in your husbands case he may be sleeping through it.......from exhaustion.

Impotence is also linked to untreated apnoea.

IMHO, your husband's inattention to his untreated apnoea has allowed the condition to develop/deteriorate further and a number of the side effects are becoming more pronounced. He is at increased risk of a stroke or heart attack.

He must realise that he is not superman and is not able to fight this thing through neglect.

Feel free to rant, at any time....if it helps.

I suggest that you print this reply and put it in front of him. I have no axe to grind, but I have been there and have a good idea of how he is feeling.........and can only imagine how bad things are for you and your children.

Best of luck and don't be afraid to keep posting.

Daniel.
The untreated Sleep Apnoea sufferer died quietly in his sleep..
Unlike his three passengers who died screaming !


The first 40 years of childhood are by far the hardest
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Postby Mr. Clean » Wed Sep 20, 2006 9:08 pm

Swelling in the legs is a sure sign of pulmonary edema and is likely an indicator of congestive heart failure.

My late father smoked, was overweight as an adult, snored terribly, kicked his leg while sleeping and had alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. This caused his lungs do develp emphysema. As a result, he had severe congestive heart failure and his legs and feet swelled so much he could not put shoes on them.

Typical of men, he waited too long to see a doctor and was told in 1991 that he would not live to the year 2000. He died in 1994.

Your husband needs to see a cardiopulmonary specialist. Apnea is one of his problems but it is far from his only problem. If he sees a doctor and follow instructions he will have to take a diuretic (like Lasix) to get the excess fluid out of his body, and a blood thinner to reduce blood pressure and the stress on his heart.

If your husband does nothing, he will only get worse. You can ask but it is his decision. Men tend not to go to the doctor until the problem is so serious that only the symptoms can be treated, but nothing can be done about the underlying problem.
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Thanks for your responses

Postby Guest » Wed Sep 20, 2006 10:48 pm

Your responses confirmed what I was thinking based on the information I have read. He did agree to go to an appointment for a check up. It is not for a while but I was planning on calling the Doctor ahead of time because I don't think my husband will bring up the swelling. And, it is episodal so it may not be present the day he goes. I am just hoping that he won't back out of the appointment saying he is too busy.... I'll post later to let you know how it went.
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Postby Guest » Sat Sep 23, 2006 11:44 am

Mr. Clean,

Your post was helpful. I disagree, however, that leg swelling is a sure sign of pulmonary edema or congestive heart failure. Swelling in the legs is called "dependent edema". (Interestingly, dependent edema can occur in the back in a bedriddent person.) Leg edema can also occur if a woman has damaged leg valves due to pregnancies or severe overweight. This type of swelling should disappear if she elevates her legs at night and limits salt intake.
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Postby BARBCCRN » Sat Sep 23, 2006 2:22 pm

Guest-there is no oxygen involved with straight CPAP.CPAP is the pressure that is required to "splint" open the airway and to prevent the symptoms of OSA
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Using CPAP while awake

Postby simon teddy » Thu Jan 07, 2010 8:43 pm

I am not convinced that cpap has no benefits when used while one is awake. Obviously it does not address the apnea/hypopnea problem, but from my own experience, using cpap while awake can assist in slowing down one's breathing and eventually in lowering blood pressure. In this sense it can be seen as a relaxation tool. I have found that if I use cpap while awake I can enter into a very beautiful, meditative state which is more difficult for me to achieve when I am not supported by cpap.
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Re: Using CPAP while awake

Postby Roses » Thu Jan 07, 2010 9:00 pm

If you get to the complete end of your rope with your husband, you can always ask him to tell you now what arrangements he wants you to make for his funeral. Perhaps the starkness of the statement will make it sink in a little more.
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