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Social Security Disability

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Social Security Disability

Postby acecommander » Mon Apr 21, 2008 7:35 pm

Is severe sleep apnea considered a disability under Social Security and does anyone here receive benefits from this disorder, even if you have other disabilities?
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Postby justplainbill » Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:38 pm

We had a similar thread here a few months back. See: http://www.apneasupport.org/viewtopic.p ... highlight=.

Essentially, Social Security Disability provides benefits for people who have paid into the Social Security system who, by nature of illness or disability, are no longer able to work. More information on the guidelines used to determine this can be found here: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/d&s1.htm .

I hope this is helpful.

Best wishes,
Bill
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Postby Mrs Rip Van Winkle » Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:47 pm

I have had my appeals hearing for SSDI...judge decided to send me to MMPI testing. It is not the condition itself but what it does to you. Two equal people could have the same conditions at the same severity however, one person is dealing with it the other is having problems. Lots of laws. Also depends on age. After age 50 they use a grid to help determine if you qualify...I am 48 so they can not grid me...therfore more tests.

My case is not based solely on my SA. I have other conditions but they make you kind of pick the major problem...mine is fatigue, Primary CNS Hypersomnia. My other conditions have fatigue as symptoms or the meds to treat/ relieve pain etc, cause fatigue...I can not take most meds due to that. My file is about 1 foot thick! or more!
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SSDI

Postby acecommander » Tue Apr 22, 2008 12:27 am

Thanks for the info. I also have other medical problems which revealed my OSA during an office visit when I fell asleep while the doctor and tech were in the room examining me. I developed complete sudden hearing loss in my left ear last October and after 2 MRI's the findings revealed a epidermoid tumor impinging on the 8th cranial nerve. Other than my symptoms from the OSA, I have severe balance issues and am dizzy most of the time, which seems to be worse since I started CPAP last week. So far I have been adapting well to my mask, but when I turn on my side the force of the air almost blows my wife out of bed. Right now my rate is 20cm. From what I've read on this forum that sounds kind of high? Is it :?:
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Postby Mrs Rip Van Winkle » Tue Apr 22, 2008 10:51 pm

Yep...it is high pressure. If you can convince your Dr that you *fail* CPAP you may be able to get a BiLevel machine...don't know if it would help but with the dizziness being worse....may. My dr just scripted me a bipap due to aerophagia, vertigo, and other issues.

My DH does not mind the air (only13) but I still put a pillow between us to block it for him. He says he just dreams that it is Seven of Nine whispering sweet nothings to him.
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Re: Social Security Disability

Postby coneyann » Sun May 11, 2008 12:37 am

[quote="acecommander"]Is severe sleep apnea considered a disability under Social Security and does anyone here receive benefits from this disorder, even if you have other disabilities?[/quote
I receive disability for sleep apnea, COPD and obesity.l]
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Postby Mrs Rip Van Winkle » Mon Aug 18, 2008 10:54 pm

Update:

I just received the judges decision...I am disabled! I have many conditions which include SA, RLS and Fibromyalgia.
I'm only a sufferer, not a medical pro. What I post are my thoughts as a sufferer, not that of the ASAA. As a moderator on these forums I oversee the posting rules. This is the internet, always discuss what you read with your medical team.
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Postby seajoy » Sun Oct 12, 2008 6:58 am

I'm applying for disabilty this week. I just got out of the hospital this past thursday for depression....again. I have Fibromyagia, sleep apnea, OCD/depression/anxiety and a bum shoulder. I have never applied before, out of guilt I guess. But I worked for 20yrs, so I know I shouldn't feel that way.
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Disability Chat

Postby Okie » Sun Oct 12, 2008 11:09 am

Another sleep site is sponsoring an evening chat regarding disability issues this coming Thursday night. For those that might be interested:

{{TSK TSK...:-) Commercial Link removed}}
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Postby lking » Sun Oct 12, 2008 11:47 am

seajoy wrote:I'm applying for disabilty this week. I just got out of the hospital this past thursday for depression....again. I have Fibromyagia, sleep apnea, OCD/depression/anxiety and a bum shoulder. I have never applied before, out of guilt I guess. But I worked for 20yrs, so I know I shouldn't feel that way.


You might consider pm'ing Mrs. Rip Van Winkle for some advice. She just recently got her disability approval.
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Re: Social Security Disability

Postby franduv » Mon Apr 26, 2010 11:10 am

acecommander wrote:Is severe sleep apnea considered a disability under Social Security and does anyone here receive benefits from this disorder, even if you have other disabilities?
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Postby blebs » Mon May 10, 2010 7:53 am

http://www.ssa.gov/disability/professio ... stings.htm

3.10 Sleep-related breathing disorders. Evaluate under 3.09 (chronic cor pulmonale), or 12.02 (organic mental disorders).

3.09 Cor pulmonale secondary to chronic pulmonary vascular hypertension. Clinical evidence of cor pulmonale (documented according to 3.00G) with:

A. Mean pulmonary artery pressure greater than 40 mm Hg;

or

B. Arterial hypoxemia. Evaluate under the criteria in 3.02C2.

G. Chronic cor pulmonale and pulmonary vascular disease. The establishment of an impairment attributable to irreversible cor pulmonale secondary to chronic pulmonary hypertension requires documentation by signs and laboratory findings of right ventricular overload or failure (e.g., an early diastolic right-sided gallop on auscultation, neck vein distension, hepatomegaly, peripheral edema, right ventricular outflow tract enlargement on x-ray or other appropriate imaging techniques, right ventricular hypertrophy on ECG, and increased pulmonary artery pressure measured by right heart catheterization available from treating sources).

Cardiac catheterization will not be purchased. Because hypoxemia may accompany heart failure and is also a cause of pulmonary hypertension, and may be associated with hypoventilation and respiratory acidosis, arterial blood gases may demonstrate hypoxemia (decreased PO2), CO2 retention (increased PCO2), and acidosis (decreased pH). Polycythemia with an elevated red blood cell count and hernatocrit may be found in the presence of chronic hypoxemia.

P-pulmonale on the ECG does not establish chronic pulmonary hypertension or chronic cor pulmonale. Evidence of florid right heart failure need not be present at the time of adjudication for a listing (e.g., 3.09) to be satisfied, but the medical evidence of record should establish that cor pulmonale is chronic and irreversible.

H. Sleep-related breathing disorders. Sleep-related breathing disorders (sleep apneas) are caused by periodic cessation of respiration associated with hypoxemia and frequent arousals from sleep. Although many individuals with one of these disorders will respond to prescribed treatment, in some, the disturbed sleep pattern and associated chronic nocturnal hypoxemia cause daytime sleepiness with chronic pulmonary hypertension and/or disturbances in cognitive function. Because daytime sleepiness can affect memory, orientation and personality, a longitudinal treatment record may be needed to evaluate mental functioning.

Not all individuals with sleep apnea develop a functional impairment that affects work activity. When any gainful work is precluded, the physiologic basis for the impairment may be chronic cor pulmonale. Chronic hypoxemia due to episodic apnea may cause pulmonary hypertension (see 3.00G and 3.09). Daytime somnolence may be associated with disturbance in cognitive vigilance. Impairment of cognitive function may be evaluated under organic mental disorders (12.02).

3.02c2 C. Chronic impairment of gas exchange due to clinically documented pulmonary disease. With:

2. Arterial blood gas values of PO2 and simultaneously determined PCO2 measured while at rest (breathing room air, awake and sitting or standing) in a clinically stable condition on at least two occasions, three or more weeks apart within a 6-month period, equal to or, less then the values specified in the applicable table III-A or III-B or III-C:

12.02 Organic mental disorders: Psychological or behavioral abnormalities associated with a dysfunction of the brain. History and physical examination or laboratory tests demonstrate the presence of a specific organic factor judged to be etiologically related to the abnormal mental state and loss of previously acquired functional abilities.

The required level of severity for these disorders is met when the requirements in both A and B are satisfied, or when the requirements in C are satisfied.

A. Demonstration of a loss of specific cognitive abilities or affective changes and the medically documented persistence of at least one of the following:

1. Disorientation to time and place; or

2. Memory impairment, either short-term (inability to learn new information), intermediate, or long-term (inability to remember information that was known sometime in the past); or

3. Perceptual or thinking disturbances (e.g., hallucinations, delusions); or

4. Change in personality; or

5. Disturbance in mood; or

6. Emotional lability (e.g., explosive temper outbursts, sudden crying, etc.) and impairment in impulse control; or

7. Loss of measured intellectual ability of at least 15 I.Q. points from premorbid levels or overall impairment index clearly within the severely impaired range on neuropsychological testing, e.g., Luria-Nebraska, Halstead-Reitan, etc;

AND

B. Resulting in at least two of the following:

1. Marked restriction of activities of daily living; or

2. Marked difficulties in maintaining social functioning; or

3. Marked difficulties in maintaining concentration, persistence, or pace; or

4. Repeated episodes of decompensation, each of extended duration;

OR

C. Medically documented history of a chronic organic mental disorder of at least 2 years' duration that has caused more than a minimal limitation of ability to do basic work activities, with symptoms or signs currently attenuated by medication or psychosocial support, and one of the following:

1. Repeated episodes of decompensation, each of extended duration; or

2. A residual disease process that has resulted in such marginal adjustment that even a minimal increase in mental demands or change in the environment would be predicted to cause the individual to decompensate; or

3. Current history of 1 or more years' inability to function outside a highly supportive living arrangement, with an indication of continued need for such an arrangement.
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Re: Social Security Disability

Postby IsrvChrist » Fri Jun 11, 2010 5:30 pm

acecommander wrote:Is severe sleep apnea considered a disability under Social Security and does anyone here receive benefits from this disorder, even if you have other disabilities?


I receive disability for CFS. It took me years to get approved. But from my experience, it depended on my education, and weather or not I could do any of the jobs I had done in the past, or if there was any job that could accommodate my fatigue, like giving me breaks every couple of hours, and allowing me to take a 2 hour nap and such. Almost everyone is refused when they first apply and must appeal, and in some cases get a lawyer. I am glad I did because the day I had my hearing I was so tired, my lawyer was able to do most of the talking, and all I had to do was pretty much answer yes and no questions.

I am not sure if OSA is a disability on its own, but I do know that being to "tired" or "fatigue" to work is.
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Postby Machine090767 » Wed Aug 11, 2010 12:34 am

I just applied for Disability because of my Sleep apnea, Obesity (over 200lbs overweight) high BP, Lymphedema and Diabetes. I'm Hoping I get "accepted"
Diagnosed April 1, 2009 (no fooling) Male, Born in MCMLXVII
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PostThis post was deleted by Daniel on Fri Dec 09, 2011 3:39 pm.
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