Sleep study and sleeping position

This area is for discussion of Sleep Studies used in the evaluation of Sleep Apnea.


Sleep study and sleeping position

Postby Annarch » Sun Apr 04, 2010 11:09 pm

Hi,

I've had the first sleep study that diagnosed severe sleep apnea (I'm getting a copy of report - it's in the mail??). But, when I went in for the study the technician asked me if I was a back sleeper, side sleeper or stomach sleeper. I've been a side sleeper for all of my adult life, probably before that even but I don't remember that far back. Anyway, the tech said "They like you to sleep on your back for the study." So, being the obedient thing that I am, I went to sleep on my back - now, I also have lower back problems so for the following two days my back hurt, but that's not really my question. After the study was sent to my primary care doc, I scheduled a follow-up with her and she said that, in her opinion, sleeping on my side would not reduce the apnea from severe to negligable so the severe apnea diagnosis stands. So, my question to y'all is, has anybody out there had a sleep study where you've slept on your side, and do you think it made a difference in your diagnosis? I guess the follow-up is that I see very little on the internet about masks that are used for side sleepers.

Don't get me wrong - I trust my primary care doc, and if she says it wouldn't make a lot of difference then I believe that. I am just interested in the experience of others. Thanks!
Annarch
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 7:21 pm
Location: Colorado

Postby base2balls » Mon Apr 05, 2010 2:09 am

:-D :-D :-D I don't think it makes that much diffrence in my opinion. They told me to try to sleep on my mack for part of the study, but most of the time I was on my side. When they did the titration, I was on my back alot because on the cpap they had me on, I could sleep on my back. I could breather and it was comfortable let alone they had me on a sleep number bed. I don't know what the pressure was set at on the cpap at the beginning of the study, but it felt so good and I could breathe, but I slept. They said I did not get into a REM sleep and the said they like to get some data on that. The first study I could not sleep on my back for long periods of time but tried it a few times. Have a great day, Huggies, Fay
User avatar
base2balls
 
Posts: 215
Joined: Sat Jan 23, 2010 4:54 pm

Re: Sleep study and sleeping position

Postby Daniel » Mon Apr 05, 2010 6:04 am

I've had the first sleep study that diagnosed severe sleep apnea (I'm getting a copy of report - it's in the mail??). But, when I went in for the study the technician asked me if I was a back sleeper, side sleeper or stomach sleeper. I've been a side sleeper for all of my adult life, probably before that even but I don't remember that far back. Anyway, the tech said "They like you to sleep on your back for the study." So, being the obedient thing that I am, I went to sleep on my back - now, I also have lower back problems so for the following two days my back hurt, but that's not really my question.


You may have started sleeping on your back, but you won't know exactly how you slept until such time as you get the sleep study report.
It is unlikely that you spent the whole night sleeping on your back.

After the study was sent to my primary care doc, I scheduled a follow-up with her and she said that, in her opinion, sleeping on my side would not reduce the apnea from severe to negligable so the severe apnea diagnosis stands. So, my question to y'all is, has anybody out there had a sleep study where you've slept on your side, and do you think it made a difference in your diagnosis? I guess the follow-up is that I see very little on the internet about masks that are used for side sleepers.


Sleep Apnoea is usually more severe while sleeping on your back, also during REM Sleep.........BUT you need to know exactly how you slept (position wise). The report will also tell you the number of events in each position.

As a rule of thumb........your PCP is insufficiently qualified to deal with you on Sleep Apnoea issues ( you can't expect them to have the training required). You should get an appointment to see the sleep specialist who signed off your report. If you continue with your PCP, it can end up with you going to the PCP (with a problem), they phone the sleep specialist and then get back to you as soon as the call is returned.......you know how stories change with each telling.............organ grinders and monkeys.........you should always deal with the organ grinder.

Don't get me wrong - I trust my primary care doc, and if she says it wouldn't make a lot of difference then I believe that. I am just interested in the experience of others. Thanks!


Appreciate that............but it is a knowledge and experience thing.............go to the sleep specialist.

Daniel.
The untreated Sleep Apnoea sufferer died quietly in his sleep..
Unlike his three passengers who died screaming !


The first 40 years of childhood are by far the hardest
Daniel
 
Posts: 6013
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:49 am
Location: Ireland
Machine: Philips Respironics System One Auto
Mask: ResMed Micro Nasal Mask
Humidifier: No
Year Diagnosed: 1993

Postby billg0519 » Mon Apr 05, 2010 9:03 am

I started out on my back after I told that that I always start on my side. They told me that is how they do it. I was not pleased. I received my report and it said that I was on my back about a third of the time and on my two sides about a third of the time each. Seems strange because I fell asleep and woke up on my back which makes me think I was that way all night because I could hardly move the next morning - not to mention the bed was as hard as the floor. I truly believe that we should be allowed to be studied in our normal way to get to sleep. I think making someone sleep on their back only makes the problem show up easier. I still won't accept my test results because of this skewed way of testing. If I had known last summer what I know now, I would not have taken the sleep study and been much better off not knowing.
billg0519
 
Posts: 58
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 11:13 am
Location: Wellman, IA

Postby Annarch » Mon Apr 05, 2010 2:28 pm

Thanks for the information. I finally have my second study scheduled for next week, and I know that the sleep specialist has confirmed that I can sleep on my side (well, I can start out that way) so we'll see what happens. And in the meantime I am almost not sleeping at all because I'm worried about the whole thing!! Silly.
Annarch
 
Posts: 67
Joined: Sun Mar 28, 2010 7:21 pm
Location: Colorado

Postby jclynadms » Sat Apr 24, 2010 1:11 am

Hi Bill, You are right that we should more often sleep on our sides as this would help the pain to be a lot more less than that would have to be experienced while sleeping on your back. I think that we should try different positions and experience it ourselves and then follow the one that works best for us.
jclynadms
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Apr 23, 2010 11:19 pm

Postby CrohnieToo » Sat Apr 24, 2010 8:06 am

You guys are not LISTENING or paying attention to what you are READING. IT IS TRUE, the vast majority of people experience most, and often the most severe, of their apnea events while sleeping on their back and while in REM sleep. To get the worst case scenario they like to be able to record at least one cycle of REM sleep while in the supine position (on your back).

VERY FEW people, even those w/back problems, sleep w/o spending some time sleeping on their back. I can personally vouch for that via my husband who has severe back problems for which he has had 3 surgeries. His entire lumbar region, all lumber vertebrae, are fused and stabilized w/isola instrumentation (metal rods). He swears he can't sleep on his back. But he does. He just isn't aware of it as he starts out on one side and wakes on one side or the other. But I KNOW he sleeps on his back as I've seen it, plus he snores only while on his back (but will NOT have a sleep study). He goes to bed before I do usually and he's OFTEN on his back when I go in to go to bed.

Conversely, I know for a fact, that I've spent ONE titration sleeping ONLY on my back all night. And I have PROOF of that as well as PROOF via another titration that I spent the entire night sleeping only on my sides. Each titration involved AT LEAST five hours of actual sleep time.

My experience has been that wearing a mask during sleep encourages you to sleep on your back to avoid mask leaks. It can take quite awhile for some of us to start sleeping on our sides again after starting PAP therapy.

I was a tummy sleeper all my life until a whiplash in 1994. Due to neck discomfort I learned to sleep on my sides and back. That whiplash was also the beginning of my sleep problems.

Once you find a comfortable mask you will find sleeping on your sides w/that mask won't be all that difficult. Its just a matter of making some adjustments. For me it was using a down pillow that I could punch and scrunch as needed to be comfortable and allow for the mask. For others a pillow made especially for PAP users such as the PAPillow. For some a buckwheat hull pillow. We all have to experiment and find what works best for us.
ResScan 3.10 - Resmed S8 ResLink & oximeter
ConTec CMS-50D+ oximeter - Philips EverFlo 5L Oxygen Concentrator
PR SystemOne BPAP Auto w/Bi-Flex & Humidifier - EncorePro 2.2.14.0
User avatar
CrohnieToo
 
Posts: 7943
Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 9:18 pm
Location: Mid-Michigan
Machine: Resmed S8 VPAP Auto
Mask: Resmed Quattro FX Small
Humidifier: Resmed H3i
Year Diagnosed: 2006

Re: Sleep study and sleeping position

Postby Char2 » Wed Jun 26, 2013 10:41 pm

It can and DOES make a big difference. You are there to simulate YOUR at home sleep. At some point you will have to lie on your back but in my opinion your test is worthless.
Char2
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jun 26, 2013 10:27 pm

Re: Sleep study and sleeping position

Postby Traveee » Sat Jul 13, 2013 5:15 am

If it was mild OSA I would say it might be possible for it to be positional, but severe OSA it doesn't matter there will be obstructions. I have run thousands of sleep studies and can tell you I have never seen some sleep on their sides and have nothing then roll on their backs and have severe. It doesn't happen. I don't make people sleep in an specific position, though I do ask to see some back sleep towards the end of the night. Either way you will need to use CPAP. Char2 is incorrect you are not there to simulate your home sleep. there is no possible way to do that attached to all those wires. You are there to see if you stop breathing during the night and you clearly do.
Traveee
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2013 3:49 am



  • Site Supporter

Return to Sleep Studies

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests