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Rescan Software

This area is for CPAP Mask and CPAP Machine Related Questions used in the treatment of Sleep Apnea.


Rescan Software

Postby gbuten » Sat Mar 26, 2011 12:15 pm

Newbee here and I just installed the Rescan 3.12 software. When I downloaded the data all I can see is the report showing device usage for the past two days. When I go to detailed reports it shows non available. Doesnt this software tell me more than when I turned in on and off?
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Postby CrohnieToo » Sat Mar 26, 2011 12:34 pm

It depends on which model Resmed PAP you are using. Look on the front cover of your Users Manual and it will say which model Resmed PAP you are using.

The Resmed Escapes are not fully data capable. The Resmed Elites and AutoSets are fully data capable.
ResScan 3.10 - Resmed S8 ResLink & oximeter
ConTec CMS-50D+ oximeter - Philips EverFlo 5L Oxygen Concentrator
PR SystemOne BPAP Auto w/Bi-Flex & Humidifier - EncorePro 2.2.14.0
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Year Diagnosed: 2006

Postby gbuten » Sat Mar 26, 2011 12:41 pm

Mine is the escap rats. Guess my insurance gave me the cheap one. I wonder why they want me to bring in the flash card every now and then if all they get is on off data?
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Postby jessy 49 » Sat Mar 26, 2011 3:38 pm

gbuten wrote:Mine is the escap rats. Guess my insurance gave me the cheap one. I wonder why they want me to bring in the flash card every now and then if all they get is on off data?

They want the info so that they can prove that you're using it and therefore they can get paid. DMEs are in business to make money. If they make you happy as well -- that's a nice bonus.

Can you return the Escape and get, at the very least, an Elite? They normally are billed to insurance using the same code number. DME just makes more money on the Escape than the would on an Elite.
Severe OSA
ResMed S8 Elite with ResMed Activa LT mask, pressure 14
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Postby gbuten » Sat Mar 26, 2011 6:12 pm

I will ask about that I have to bring the chip into them on Monday.
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Postby CrohnieToo » Sat Mar 26, 2011 9:20 pm

It wasn't your insurance that chose the Escape for you, it was your current DME provider who chose it for you.

The card for the Escape just provides compliance data, i.e. how many nights, how many hours per night, how many hours total, you have used your PAP. Insurances don't want to pay for a PAP to sit unused in someone's closet.

If you have had that Escape less than 30 days, take it back to your provider and ask them to exchange it for an Elite. Or an AutoSet. The Elite will do just fine. I loved mine.

Read the forum here and you will learn how to handle getting the Escape exchanged for an Elite. Or Auto. The procedure has been explained many times in many threads.
ResScan 3.10 - Resmed S8 ResLink & oximeter
ConTec CMS-50D+ oximeter - Philips EverFlo 5L Oxygen Concentrator
PR SystemOne BPAP Auto w/Bi-Flex & Humidifier - EncorePro 2.2.14.0
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Posts: 7943
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Machine: Resmed S8 VPAP Auto
Mask: Resmed Quattro FX Small
Humidifier: Resmed H3i
Year Diagnosed: 2006

Postby robysue » Sat Mar 26, 2011 11:21 pm

gbuten wrote:Mine is the escap rats. Guess my insurance gave me the cheap one. I wonder why they want me to bring in the flash card every now and then if all they get is on off data?

The insurance company didn't give you the Escape. The DME sold or rented you and your insurance company the Escape.

Why? Because the insurance company most likely pays for xPAP machines by something called HCPC codes. These are billing codes, and the HCPC code for a CPAP machine is E0601. And ANY CPAP or APAP machine (but not a bilevel or ASV machine) is E0601, from the dumbest brick of a machine without data capability or EPR to the top of the line machine with all the bells and whistles you could wish for. And most likely your insurance company pays one price regardless of which machine you get within the E0601 HCPCs code. So the only one who really cares (besides you) about what machine you get is the DME. If you get the bottom of the line brick, the DME makes a lot of money. If you get the top of the line bells and whistles machine, the DME makes very little. Guess which one the DME wants you to get?

And the DME wants you to bring that data card in to get the compliance data read because they want to get paid for that machine they set you up with. And the insurance company doesn't really care whether you've got the data to make sure your treatment is effective: They only want to know you are using the machine enough to satisfy their rules about compliance, which are likely built on top of the Medicare rules. In other words, the insurance company does not want to pay for a machine that's been thrown in the closet and is not being used, but it will pay as long as you use the machine.

So it is up to you to make sure that you and your insurance company get your money's worth out of what you are paying for the equipment. Take the machine back to the DME and politely, but firmly insist that they switch your Escape out for an S9 Elite or and S9 AutoSet. It will help if you can get your doctor to write a prescription specifying "CPAP with patient access to full efficacy data", but many doctors will be reluctant to do that.
current settings Min EPAP = 4, Max IPAP = 8 and Rise time = 3

8/1/2010 sleep study results:
AHI = 3.9 [AHI = (#OA +#CA + #H w/desat) per hour]
RDI = 23.4 [RDI = (#OA +CA + #H w/desat + #H w/arousal) per hour]
Dx: Moderate OSA
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Posts: 1330
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Location: Buffalo, NY
Machine: PR System One BiPAP Auto
Mask: Swift FX for Her
Humidifier: System One Heated Humidif
Year Diagnosed: 2010

Postby trebons » Sat Mar 26, 2011 11:58 pm

It,s unbelievable that in this stone age that they give these basic machine to any one knowingly it does only record hours used in order to meet insurance requirement and a simple software upgrade will make it a data-capable machine ,even considering the price difference between the basic and the top end machines is very small ,there is is no other group of patients treated like fools by their doctors (most of them) or their equipment suppliers .
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Machine: S9 AutoSet
Mask: Nasal

Postby gbuten » Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:30 am

Thanks you so much a little bit of information can go a long way. I hope you don't mind but I do have a few questions. The reason I had the sleep study in the first place was because the hospital insisted, due that the fact I'm have a total knee replacement. I guess it some new standard and they make sure we have a CPAP machine while in recovery. So I'm told I have sleep apnea a week before I have surgury and I am despertly trying to get used to all of this. This will be my third night trying to sleep with this mask on my face and in a few days I will be in the hospital with it as well. I guess what I'm asking and I know even before asking that no one can give me a clear cut answere. But, how long does it take for someone to sleep through the night without thinking about it. I'm not uncomfortable and I have slept, but not as well as before I had the machine. I am sure glad I stumbled accross this site.
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Postby gbuten » Sun Mar 27, 2011 12:42 am

I am searching to find out how I can get it exchanged heck maybe the DME's read this forum.
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Postby trebons » Sun Mar 27, 2011 1:22 am

How long it take :well for some almost like fish to water slap it on and sleep 7 or 8 hours and wake up ready to run marathon but for the majority it takes a bit longer , it takes time and experience to be able to make it work for you as you need to find the right mask that is comfortable for you to keep it on all night and your body need to adjust to the therapy but with positive spirit and a bit of tweaking you should look forward to happy sleeping and good luck with your operation .
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Posts: 169
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Machine: S9 AutoSet
Mask: Nasal

Postby gbuten » Sun Mar 27, 2011 6:45 am

I don't think comfort is the problem I dont take it off in my sleep. But I do wake up around 4 to 4:30 after going to bed around 10 to 11. I was a firefighter for 30 years and when I retired I had to start taking drugs to sleep through the night. I've always been a light sleeper and even with taking Lunesta or Zanex I would wake pretty early. But this is night 3 and it's 4:43 and I'm awake, but not exhausted so I guess that's a good sign. I do think I need to find a different pillow as my neck seems pretty sore. Is that a common problem?
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Postby robysue » Sun Mar 27, 2011 9:19 am

gbuten wrote:I do think I need to find a different pillow as my neck seems pretty sore. Is that a common problem?
Yep, waking up with a sore neck and/or back is a common problem at the beginning of CPAP therapy. Lots of folks are extra careful about moving around when they are adjusting to sleeping with the mask and others are sleeping deeply and restfully for the first time in years. In both cases, there's a tendency to not move around as much when you're asleep, which can lead to muscle soreness---particularly in the neck and back since many folks are also falling asleep in awkward positions because of worrying about knocking the mask off. As both your mind and body get used to the mask, you start to wiggle in your sleep again and you start to find positions that are decent for both the neck/back and the mask. And so the problem usually resolves itself in a few weeks at most.

I don't think comfort is the problem I dont take it off in my sleep. But I do wake up around 4 to 4:30 after going to bed around 10 to 11. I was a firefighter for 30 years and when I retired I had to start taking drugs to sleep through the night. I've always been a light sleeper and even with taking Lunesta or Zanex I would wake pretty early. But this is night 3 and it's 4:43 and I'm awake, but not exhausted so I guess that's a good sign.
Since you've had previous problems with insomnia, it is quite possible that all the new sensory stimuli from the CPAP is triggering some insomnia tendencies. It's also possible that since you are waking up not exhausted after being in bed for between 5 and 6 1/2 hours of sleep with CPAP, that you are getting enough sleep to function because your sleep is higher quality than you were getting before starting CPAP.

I'd suggest two things: First call the sleep doctor's office and ask to speak to a nurse or PA about the "waking up too early" problem. Mention your previous (current?) use of Lunesta and Zanex. Judicious use of sleeping medication may help your current problem if it has helped you in the past. The nurse or PA may also suggest that you work on improving your sleep hygiene as well. Guidelines for sleep hygiene can be found at: http://www.umm.edu/sleep/sleep_hyg.htm for example.

Second, you might want to try this trick: Simply go to bed a bit later. Figure out the "new" temporary bedtime by asking yourself: What time do you want to wake up at seven days a week? Then make your bedtime about 6 1/2 to 7 hours earlier than your desired wake up time since you are sleeping 6 1/2 hours on some nights. See if that's enough sleep for you to comfortably function on indefinitely. If it is, fine. If not, slowly move bedtime back by 15 minute increments once you are consistently sleeping through the night at the current "time in bed" window.

To illustrate what I mean: Let's suppose that 6:30 AM is your desired wake up time. Move bedtime to midnight for awhile: Simply don't allow yourself to go to bed until it's midnight (or later) and you are sleepy. Once you are consistently sleeping from midnight to 6:30, then try moving bedtime to 11:45. Once you are sleeping consistently sleeping from 11:45 to 6:30, move bedtime back to 11:30. And continue this process until you get your bedtime moved back to where you want it to be. Give yourself at least a week or two at each incremental change in bedtime to make sure that you really are sleeping through the night. And if you don't, then move the bedtime back to the previous time where you were sleeping through the night.

The reason I had the sleep study in the first place was because the hospital insisted, due that the fact I'm have a total knee replacement. I guess it some new standard and they make sure we have a CPAP machine while in recovery.
Although it does not seem like it right now, your surgeon has done you a big favor: He is a surgeon who genuinely understands the very real risks that folks with OSA face during any kind of surgery requiring anesthesia---during the surgery itself and after the surgery---both in the recovery room and after being moved to a regular room---particularly if strong, narcotic-based pain relievers are used. And so he's chosen (wisely) to not operate on folks who may have undiagnosed OSA. Hence, because he's in a position to do it, he requires screening for OSA and documentation that the OSA is being properly treated before he's willing to operate. And as you noted, the hospital requires its OSA patients to bring their CPAP with them to the hospital too. That's to insure they run into no additional complications or problems due to irregular breathing and possible oxygen desaturations when they are asleep or unconscious.

Moreover, the not-so-funny thing about OSA is that is it thought to be as common as type II diabetes (based on epidemiology studies), but because the diagnosis requires an expensive full night lab test instead of a rather inexpensive blood test, OSA remains seriously under diagnosed: It is simply not routinely tested for by GPs, unlike diabetes and HBP and a host of other common chronic conditions. But untreated OSA has a host of nasty effects on the body and raises the chances of developing several serious conditions as co-morbidities. Among them are: Serious complications to surgery involving anesthesia and/or narcotic-based pain killers (see above), HPB that is resistant to treatment, diabetes, congestive heart failure, stroke, and a changing metabolism that makes it both easier to gain weight and harder to lose it.

And finally, the good news---which doesn't seem good at first---is that OSA can be treated and treated very effectively through the use of CPAP. And that, for all the trouble and expense of CPAP therapy, it uses a completely benign substance (room air) to essentially eliminate the apneas, which in turn can prevent the co-morbidities from developing or delay their developing in the OSA sufferer.

Best of luck with the knee surgery. And your recovery. And your membership in the hosehead club.
current settings Min EPAP = 4, Max IPAP = 8 and Rise time = 3

8/1/2010 sleep study results:
AHI = 3.9 [AHI = (#OA +#CA + #H w/desat) per hour]
RDI = 23.4 [RDI = (#OA +CA + #H w/desat + #H w/arousal) per hour]
Dx: Moderate OSA
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robysue
 
Posts: 1330
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2010 6:47 pm
Location: Buffalo, NY
Machine: PR System One BiPAP Auto
Mask: Swift FX for Her
Humidifier: System One Heated Humidif
Year Diagnosed: 2010

Postby gbuten » Mon Mar 28, 2011 12:48 am

LOL. thanks so much your words my just help put me to sleep. I'm still going to meet about getting my CPAP exchanged. I'm not sure how to approach the other to say "I think I should have input in what type of CPAP I am given. And somehow I think the insureance company will be on my side on this one. Any more thoughts please feel free to express. Count down to my surgury is I day and 8 hours.
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Postby robysue » Mon Mar 28, 2011 10:08 am

Talking to the DME to get that Escape exchanged for an Elite is EXTREMELY IMPORTANT. And best of luck in this difficult conversation. Stick with it and you should be able to be successful.

And best of luck with the surgery. And hear's hoping for a very smooth and quick recovery.
current settings Min EPAP = 4, Max IPAP = 8 and Rise time = 3

8/1/2010 sleep study results:
AHI = 3.9 [AHI = (#OA +#CA + #H w/desat) per hour]
RDI = 23.4 [RDI = (#OA +CA + #H w/desat + #H w/arousal) per hour]
Dx: Moderate OSA
User avatar
robysue
 
Posts: 1330
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2010 6:47 pm
Location: Buffalo, NY
Machine: PR System One BiPAP Auto
Mask: Swift FX for Her
Humidifier: System One Heated Humidif
Year Diagnosed: 2010

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