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pressure

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pressure

Postby gmankee » Wed Oct 18, 2006 11:43 pm

can i get headaches and lightheaded if my cpap pressure is set too high
thanks
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Re: pressure

Postby Daniel » Thu Oct 19, 2006 3:39 am

gmankee wrote:can i get headaches and lightheaded if my cpap pressure is set too high
thanks


Don't know about headaches and lightheaded (ness), but cpap that is set too high can cause serious problems.

If you post more details, you will get more relevant responses.

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Postby artie » Fri Oct 20, 2006 11:29 pm

What numbers are considered high?
What are the side effects of "high pressures"?
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Postby justplainbill » Sat Oct 21, 2006 12:26 pm

Pressure is generally determined through a titration study. This determines the amount of pressure needed to keep your airway open with no more than minimal apnea/hypxia events in all parts of your sleep and when lying on your back (which is generally the most likely position in which you will have the highest rates of apnea/hyponia events).

CPAP machines generally deliver air at pressures from 4 to 20 (cm of H2O) or a little higher. If you are told you need a CPAP pressure of 14 than any pressure much over 14 would be too high. My pressure is 5 so even 14 would be definitely too high.

Bottom line-"high" depends on individual needs.

Side effects of too high a pressure may also depend on individual factors. People who need higher pressures may face greater problems with mask leakage and with being able to find a good mask interface. If you use a higher pressure than you need, you may have more of such problems and leakage also may interfere with your sleep. You could also have more serious problems, especially if you are prone to central apnea or if you have lung problems, at pressures higher than you need.

Best wishes,
Bill
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Postby JeffroDoe » Sun Oct 22, 2006 12:47 pm

gmankee,
It's likely not an issue with your pressure. Tho having a pressure too high can cause many different symptoms, headache and light-headedness, in my experience it is not that common. It's more likely something else.

Back several months ago...all the sudden I began experiencing daily headaches. Nothing worked...tylenol, ibuprophen. Then they evolved into visual disturbances, dizzy spells, and utter misery. These were daily, paralyzing, mind exploding headaches that left me unable to do anything but writhe in pain. I was on the verge of going to my doctor to see if I had a brain tumor. Then I realized that I hadn't used humidity in over a year. I wondered if that could be the problem. Lack of humidity can cause all kinds of nasty side effects, but it never dawned on me that *I* might be in that category.

I borrowed a heated humidifier from work and used it. Bingo. Almost instantly, all my symptoms vanished and have not returned in 3 months. So try raising your heated humidifier setting a notch or two and see if that doesn't remedy the problem. Also....use only distilled water.
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Pressure

Postby Guest - Archoliva » Thu Nov 16, 2006 3:45 pm

I have had problems when my pressure was set too high. I had it set @ 13 & had a sleep study done recently which indicated that 12 is the correct pressure. I was experiencing total exhaustion during the day when sleeping with the 13 pressure- similar to my symptoms prior to sleeping w/ cpap. It was approx. an 8% "overage" in pressure but in my case it makes a huge difference.
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pressure

Postby artie » Sun Nov 19, 2006 11:08 pm

1. Optimal Pressure: should you feel good, or may experience side effects from cpap therapy esecially at the begining?
2. High Pressure (anything higher than optimal) what are the most common symptoms in this situation ?
3. Low pressure (less than optimal) what kind of symptoms are expected in this situation?
Thank you very much in advance for responding with your thoughts about this issues.
Artie
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Postby JeffroDoe » Mon Nov 20, 2006 2:14 am

1) If what you call Optimal is the pressure you were titrated to in your sleep study, you should eventually start to level out and experience better quality sleep. It's not uncommon to have some mask issues, and pressure issues in the beginning. Most of these pass with time and patience. But the personality type of the patient ends up being 90% of the determining factor for success.

2)At higher than optimal pressures, many things can occur. Such as, headaches, pain in the throat or sinuses, pain in the chest and lungs, aerophagia, bleeding ears, bleeding nose, and the irritation that comes from difficulty in exhaling comfortably.

3) At lower than optimal pressures you may experience daytime sleepiness, wake up feeling unrefreshed, snoring, untreated apnea.

It's not uncommon to need an adjustment made to pressure within a couple weeks of initially beginning xpap treatment. Just because you were titrated to 10cm, does not mean that 11cm or 9cm might not be better.
Last edited by JeffroDoe on Wed Nov 22, 2006 10:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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pressure

Postby artie » Wed Nov 22, 2006 1:26 am

Jeffro-Doe, thankyou very much for your response.
I was told 3 months ago that my optimal pressure would be 16 and I had a lot of symptoms as you described above.
I decided to do another study at a different facilty just recently, and found out that all the AHI were cleared at at 9 and with REM sleep and good oxygen saturation ! Artie
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This is interesting...

Postby Guest » Wed Nov 22, 2006 10:43 am

My pressure is set at 10 and that was determined from the sleep study. When I was using a Remstar Auto, I would check the pressure reading when I woke up. Often, it was in the 8's, like 8.4. And, often it was 10. That would make me believe that the needed pressure may fluctuate according to any given night's requirements.

So, is an auto better than a fixed CPAP? #-o
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Postby JeffroDoe » Wed Nov 22, 2006 11:09 am

That's a matter for conjecture and opinion. In a case like yours where you were titrated to 10cm, but occasionally your machine felt that all you needed was 8cm, being on a cpap at 10cm constantly would have solved your apnea issue. When they titrate you, they establish what pressure will counter all of your apnea, so it would not hurt you at all to be at 10cm constantly even if some of your episodes don't require quite THAT much pressure. Perhaps the ideal situation for an auto would be when most of the patient's apnea episodes can be prevented at a low pressure, but they occasionally have spikes or periods of time where their need for pressure increases to 3cm or 4cm higher than normal. The machine will watch for that and compensate accordingly.

I am not one of those who thinks everyone should be using an auto. In fact, I think they are a bit over-prescribed and unnecessary in most cases. For the vast majority of patients I've seen, a cpap or bipap has done wonderfully. Most of the peeps I'm familiar with that were prescribed an auto were on a pressure such as 12cm or 13cm that sometimes needed to go up to 17cm or 18cm.
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Postby BARBCCRN » Wed Nov 22, 2006 1:05 pm

Jeffro- =D> =D> =D> Thank you for all of your great responses. You may actually restore my faith in believing that some good DME techs DO exist.
EVERY SILVER LINING HAS A TOUCH OF GREY
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Postby droopy eyes » Wed Nov 22, 2006 9:50 pm

=D> Ditto what Barb said---I wish I could get half that from my DME (I can't get past the receptionist/appointment setter---who apparently knows everything---to even talk to my RT). :-x
~~~Tammy~~~
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Postby JeffroDoe » Wed Nov 22, 2006 10:05 pm

Thank you for the kind words. I'll do whatever I can to assist you because I know that most DME's don't provide the level of service I am accustomed to providing. We're all learners, teachers, and doers. We need only choose our moment to step up and do what we can for others. :-D
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