Newbie needs help with sleep study report!

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Newbie needs help with sleep study report!

Postby Flame » Fri Jul 15, 2011 5:05 pm

Hi everyone, I am new here but have been 'lurking' for quite a while.

I am trying to decipher the numbers from my first study. I didn't get a copy of the second one.

I also just found out I have to go back and have a third study apparently from breakthrough apneas?

Respiratory Analysis:

AHI: 78%
NRAHI: 82.3
Rem ahi: 59.0
AHI w/4% destat: 49.0
mean sleep w/4% destat: 91
mean sleep sp0291
min % 82
NREM rem
number of events: 456 61
obstructive 123 2
mixed apnea 0 0
central 5 2

Respiratory Disturbance: 78.1
Obstructive apnea 19.1
Hypopnea 58.6

Arrythmias yes/extreme ( it reiterates extreme again but the only box ticked was 'other': pac

PLM per hour: 92

Impression: severe obstructive sleep apnea with oxygen desat
13.3% sleep w/oxy stats. below 88
numerous non obstructive apneas were observed oxy stat/80, raising possibility of hypo-ventilation or intrinsic lung disease.

I was told I have to go back a third time because I continued to apnea with the CPAP. Also something about central apnea.

I could really use some help with this report. I worry about the possibility of central apnea because I stop breathing during the day too.

Thanks everyone.

Lois
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Re: Newbie needs help with sleep study report!

Postby Linda » Fri Jul 15, 2011 6:25 pm

Hi Lois, and welcome to the forum!


I'll give it a shot.

AHI is not a percent, so look at the report again. If the AHI is 78, it means you experienced 78 apneas and/or hypopneas (nearly as bad as apneas) per hour. That is definitely severe. Generally mild is an AHI of 5-15; moderate is 15-30; severe is 30 and over. So you stopped breathing on average at least once a minute.

AHI is an average, and that was an average of your entire sleep. The NREM (non-REM sleep) was higher than your REM sleep AHI, which is a little opposite than many people, but not unheard of. Both are severe.

Your blood oxygen levels dipped to a minimum of 82%, but averaged overall at 91%. Normal blood oxygen levels are in the upper 90 percent range. Sleep apnea usually results in lowered blood oxygen levels.

There are concerns about arrythmias and other things. Don't know if you have a heart doctor, but if you do, he should be kept in the loop, just in case.

How do they know you stop breathing during the day too? Did they test you during the day?

Use of the cpap can correct many of that, but they have to be sure if there are some other conditions going on. Did they say if you will be set up with a cpap before the third sleep study? And if they do, ask what kind of cpap. And be sure that you get a full data capable cpap because the data is a good diagnostic tool. How did you feel after the second sleep study?


Linda
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You should not use info on this website to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
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Postby Flame » Fri Jul 15, 2011 6:50 pm

Hi Linda! Thank you so much for responding to my questions, you explain it very well. Now, I am beginning to understand why I am so tired all the time. I had attributed much of the fatigue to my MS, but it must be the combination of the two.

The numbers make sense now. So, the numbers with the REM are contradictory with the others?

My comment about stopping breathing during the day is my thought. I find myself not breathing and then having to catch up with breathing heavy. I have stated that on the questionairres but no one has ever discussed it with me. If I could talk with the sleep specialist neuro' it would help.

I don't have a cardiologist or pulmonologist but am going to request them if they think it's necessary. It sounds like it.

No I don't have a CPAP yet. I was given a script today but the university sleep place told me the diagnosis was missing. So, hopefully soon.

Thanks so much

Lois
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Flame
 
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2011 4:35 pm
Location: Michigan
Machine: Respironics AVAP with humidifier
Mask: Resmed Quattro Full Face FX
Humidifier: Respironics
Year Diagnosed: 2011

Re: Newbie needs help with sleep study report!

Postby Linda » Sat Jul 16, 2011 6:34 am

Hi Lois,

Make sure you have followup appointments with the doctor, hopefully the sleep specialist. Keep asking questions. And you might be right, the MS might be contributing to symptoms. Do you see a specialist for the MS? That doctor might be able to explain the relationship between the two conditions. But also, untreated sleep apnea results in lowered blood oxygen levels, so I suppose it could affect you some during the day. But it could be your muscles add some problems. But I bet the cpap will really help you.

As to the REM v. non-Rem, for some people, the rate of sleep apnea is higher during REM dream stage. Sleep is a cycle... we cycle through the the various sleep stages several times durimg the night. ... Stages 1, 2, 3, REM, then repeat..... REM is a small percentage of sleep, but we might experience it several times during the night. For many with untreated sleep apnea, that sleep cycle is disrupted. Some may rarely or even never reach deep sleep (Stage 3, different from REM) because their body is arousing them out of sleep when they stop breathing. And there might be less frequent REM. Everyone is a little different. But also, during REM, we are paralyzed. I forget how it's done, some sort of hormone, I think. It keeps us from acting out our dreams (good thing, too!) As a result, our throat tissues are even more relaxed than usual, making obstructive sleep apnea worse. But it might not be worse in everyone. Sleep apnea can be worse while sleeping on your back, but not for everyone.

You have the script for the machine, can you tell what the script orders? Sometimes the script is very specific, sometimes not. Might it be for a bipap or a bi-level machine? That's a type of cpap. If it's not, but just for a straight cpap, and you have any trouble breathing with it, be sure to let your doctor know, or the place where you get your machine.

Let us know how things go when you get your machine, or if you have questions at any time.


Linda
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You should not use info on this website to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease without consulting with a qualified healthcare provider.
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