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How to pass the sleep test?

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How to pass the sleep test?

Postby Donald » Wed Feb 22, 2012 3:56 pm

I just went to my doctor for my physical. He looked down my throat and asked if I snore... I replied my wife says I do. I don't know. He is also my Dad's doctor so he said as tight as my airway is and with my Dad having it also he almost guarantees I have it. So anyway I now have a sleep study scheduled for March 2. My Uncle went for his test a year or so ago and he swears he has it. He knows he has woke up struggling for breath. His test was negative. He told me he loaded up on cold medicine and pain killers to help relax him and clear his sinuses. He said he also got woke up several times for pulling his testers off. Is medicine a way to beat the test? I don't think I have it. I filled in the questions they gave me at the doctor's and didn't fill in a single blank other than snoring. What do you guys think? I just want to take the test the best I can. I don't mind having it but I don't want to have all the equipment if it isn't needed. I also don't know how much all of that equipment cost. Does the doctor provide it?
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Re: How to pass the sleep test?

Postby Mrs Rip Van Winkle » Wed Feb 22, 2012 5:15 pm

As for the test... Only take your regular meds. Loading up on stuff that may calm/relax you or anything different from your ordinary daily meds (including over the counter) can change the test results therefore, changing your therapy.

If you are in the US and have insurance, you will have your co-pays and deductibles...check your policy to see what DME (durable Medical Equipment) coverage you have. YOu will buy or rent a machine from the DME.
I'm only a sufferer, not a medical pro. What I post are my thoughts as a sufferer, not that of the ASAA. As a moderator on these forums I oversee the posting rules. This is the internet, always discuss what you read with your medical team.
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Re: How to pass the sleep test?

Postby Daniel » Wed Feb 22, 2012 5:38 pm

Donald wrote:I just went to my doctor for my physical. He looked down my throat and asked if I snore... I replied my wife says I do. I don't know. He is also my Dad's doctor so he said as tight as my airway is and with my Dad having it also he almost guarantees I have it. So anyway I now have a sleep study scheduled for March 2. My Uncle went for his test a year or so ago and he swears he has it. He knows he has woke up struggling for breath. His test was negative. He told me he loaded up on cold medicine and pain killers to help relax him and clear his sinuses. He said he also got woke up several times for pulling his testers off. Is medicine a way to beat the test? I don't think I have it. I filled in the questions they gave me at the doctor's and didn't fill in a single blank other than snoring. What do you guys think? I just want to take the test the best I can. I don't mind having it but I don't want to have all the equipment if it isn't needed. I also don't know how much all of that equipment cost. Does the doctor provide it?


Who are you trying to kid ? and who did your uncle try to kid ?........Answer is YOURSELVES.

Someone has really lost the plot here.......your uncle agreed to undergo a sleep test and pay for it (whether insurance or not he was paying for it), BUT decided he was going to try and influence the result. Why bother in the first place ?
Beating the test ?....this isn't like cheating at cards....the test is to see if you have a potentially life threatening condition, and if so can it be treated successfully......if you want to rig the test, best advice is not to have one and allow a more deserving case take your slot. It is actually for your benefit.

Don't jump the gun regarding 'equipment'......if you intend going ahead, have the sleep study, get a proper diagnosis and if you have Sleep Apnoea discuss the treatment options with your sleep specialist.....THEN you can look at costs.

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Re: How to pass the sleep test?

Postby Donald » Thu Feb 23, 2012 5:50 am

Thanks Mrs Winkle for the advice. I want to pass the test so I don't have to worry about this stuff. I don't have a problem with my sleep habits or the way I sleep. And when I said pain killers I am referring to OTC items. Nothing illegal or stuff that wasn't prescribed to him. I don't want you thinking we are that kind of people.

As for Daniel why are you being such a jerk? I come to a forum on the subject that I have a question about and you jump my butt? What kind of person are you? Needless to say I don't require anymore responses from you. I will answer your question to me even though I shouldn't after the way you responded. As for why he went and why I am going is because our doctors set up an appointment for us to go. My insurance is paying (I pay whether I use it or not) so there is nothing out of my pocket otherwise I wouldn't be there. Also if they couldn't work it around my schedule then I wouldn't be there. Luckily I work a four day work week so I always have Friday off. If I am diagnosed I intend to treat the condition but I won't pay anything to do it. My doctor is the one that suggested all of this. And cost is the top priority of anything I do. If I didn't worry about finances I wouldn't be what I am.

Now don't get me wrong but if I am sick I pay a doctor to give me something to get well. It hasn't bothered me thus far and if it does become bothersome I would treat it. For example I have already been diagnosed with a deviated septum. However there is no need to get the surgery to correct it if it isn't harming me in any way.

Maybe I am naive about this subject. Perhaps I just haven't done my research but how is this life threatening? I know you might quit breathing but any normal person would wake up when that happens. So what is the danger involved? Thanks for helping me again Mrs. Winkle. Anybody please feel to respond. However if you're responses are going to be like Daniels than don't bother. I come here to learn and educate myself and not to have people harrass me over my questions or decisions.
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Re: How to pass the sleep test?

Postby CraigB » Thu Feb 23, 2012 9:10 am

Donald,

I was just like you. My only symptom (or so I thought) was snoring. All the other boxes on the test were left unchecked. I was ready to walk out of there. However, as it turns out, I had high blood pressure caused by Sleep Apnea and a whole host of unseen problems stirring.

With Sleep Apnea, your throat closes up and you stop getting oxygen for and average of 10 to 15 seconds. This make your blood's oxygen levels drop, just a tiny bit. Problem is, when the apnea is bad, you can stop breathing almost once a minute. The less oxygen your blood has, the harder your heart has to work and the more of a strain it is. If it gets very low, some of your other organs can suffer from lack of oxygen as well. Your heart gets use to pumping extra blood to try and accommodate and this causes high blood pressure that carries forward into the rest of the day.

Myself, my blood pressure went from "high enough for medication" to normal or just under normal, in one night.

On top of that, because your body is not getting the chance to drop down into deep sleep (you tend to wake up enough to start breathing again, but not enough to notice you are awake), you miss out on the truly restful sleep. This means your immune system can be compromised and your ability to handle stress can become diminished.

In the end, all the extra stress on your heart and organs can cause failure. Heart attacks and strokes. If you have it, you really do not want to "cheat the test" because then you will never know. You could be doing all sorts of damage to your heart and organs and not even know it. At the very least, if you aren't going to treat the issue, at least find out if you have the issue.
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Re: How to pass the sleep test?

Postby Daniel » Thu Feb 23, 2012 2:49 pm

As for Daniel why are you being such a jerk? I come to a forum on the subject that I have a question about and you jump my butt? What kind of person are you? Needless to say I don't require anymore responses from you. I will answer your question to me even though I shouldn't after the way you responded. As for why he went and why I am going is because our doctors set up an appointment for us to go. My insurance is paying (I pay whether I use it or not) so there is nothing out of my pocket otherwise I wouldn't be there. Also if they couldn't work it around my schedule then I wouldn't be there. Luckily I work a four day work week so I always have Friday off. If I am diagnosed I intend to treat the condition but I won't pay anything to do it. My doctor is the one that suggested all of this. And cost is the top priority of anything I do. If I didn't worry about finances I wouldn't be what I am.


If telling it how it is, is being a jerk...then I must hold up my hand.
What type of person am I ?....a truthful one, who tells it as he sees it.
Calling me names doesn't help, and does breach our posting guidelines......but you have been allowed some leeway.
You, on the other hand don't seem to want to grasp reality.
Have a look back on your initial post.......one thing really sticking out is denial and an unwillingness to listen (or respect) others.
Your second post reinforces that, and puts your priorities in perspective, which means my wake up call has had no effect whatsoever.

Now don't get me wrong but if I am sick I pay a doctor to give me something to get well. It hasn't bothered me thus far and if it does become bothersome I would treat it. For example I have already been diagnosed with a deviated septum. However there is no need to get the surgery to correct it if it isn't harming me in any way.

Maybe I am naive about this subject. Perhaps I just haven't done my research but how is this life threatening? I know you might quit breathing but any normal person would wake up when that happens. So what is the danger involved? Thanks for helping me again Mrs. Winkle. Anybody please feel to respond. However if you're responses are going to be like Daniels than don't bother. I come here to learn and educate myself and not to have people harrass me over my questions or decisions.


You need not worry....I'll not be responding to any more of your posts.

Daniel.
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Re: How to pass the sleep test?

Postby kong » Thu Feb 23, 2012 3:13 pm

Donald, I also thought I did not have sleep apnea. The doctor at the sleep center admitted I had a low score, showing me as having a low risk for sleep apnea. My fiance was sure I didn't have sleep apnea. She said I barely snored and never gasped for air. She said she could hear me sleeping regularly during the night. However, I did the sleep study. It turns out I have severe sleep apnea. I encourage you to get the sleep study done because the doctor referred you for it, so your doctor must believe you're at risk for sleep apnea.

As to the costs for equipment, you don't even know if you have sleep apnea yet. It may turn out you don't. In that case, there is no need for equipment. You'll sleep bette knowing for certain that you don't have sleep apnea.

If you have only mild sleep apnea, losing weight, getting more exercise, or sleeping on your side may be sufficient to treat your sleep apnea. If you do have severe sleep apnea, then it's likely worth the cost that you have to pay for the equipment. (Hopefully, the insurance will pay most of it.).

As to attempting to fool the test, that's obviously a bad idea. The sleep center, however, did tell me to take the medicines I take regularly at night, including the sleeping pill, right before taking the sleep study.

Good luck.
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Re: How to pass the sleep test?

Postby Vicki » Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:01 pm

It is very common for people with untreated sleep apnea to think that the way they feel is normal. It is not until they are treated that they realize how sick they have been. It is also, very unfortunately, common for people to think that sleep apnea is only about snoring or fatigue. Some of the effects of untreated sleep apnea are below. The ASAA (the sponsors of this forum) provide PAPs for those who have a financial need www.sleepapean.org.

The effects of untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are severe and systemic. Some of them are; increased blood pressure, increased risk of heart attack and stroke (from the constant cycling in and out of hypoxia and increased blood pressure), heart arrhythmias, nocturia (because the increased pressure in the right heart ventricle makes the body think there is too much blood volume so urine is produced), headaches (especially in the morning and probably due to hypoxia), fatigue (duh), memory and concentration problems, weight gain (sleep deprivation causes weight gain for several physiological reasons, one being the alteration of the hormones leptin and ghrelin), apnea induced seizures, there is a link to diabetes, there is a link to GERD, night sweats, depression, anxiety (each apneic event is a true suffocation and elicits the "Fight or Flight" adrenalin response), Fibromyalgia-like symptoms, impotence, decreased libido, relationship and job issues, car accidents, etc.

Vicki
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Friedrich must of had apnea.
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Re: How to pass the sleep test?

Postby Grandma » Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:15 pm

Donald,
I am curious about what your dad did about his diagnosis since the doctor said he had it. It can run in families. I have a nephew and two first cousins who have been diagnosed with severe sleep apnea and they are all sleeping with machines. Recently my 40 year old son was diagnosed. If I were you, I would be really happy to have a doctor who wants to be sure that you will not become a victim of sleep apnea. Maybe you won't die from it now, but over time, if you have it, it will take a serious toll on your body. I went years with undiagnosed severe sleep apnea because I didn't want to sleep with a machine. So I ended up on blood pressure medication in my 30s. I have a lot of serious health issues that I developed over time, including GERD, memory problems, am overweight though I was very thin until I was in my 30s. I am thrilled to be sleeping with a machine now, it feels like a lifeline. But I sure wish I had been brave enough to get the study done when I was much younger or had a doctor who cared enough to suggest a study to prevent the health problems I have now.
Have the study and if you don't have sleep apnea, you can celebrate. If you do, you can find out what to do next on this forum. Believe me, your poor uncle didn't do himself any favors by trying to beat the test. If he is having the problems he says he's having, maybe you will be the one who convinces him to get the help he needs to stop the damage to his body from progressing. There are lots of people here who will help you find you way. I wish you luck and good health.
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Re: How to pass the sleep test?

Postby Donald » Tue Feb 28, 2012 2:12 pm

Grandma wrote:Donald,
I am curious about what your dad did about his diagnosis since the doctor said he had it. It can run in families. I have a nephew and two first cousins who have been diagnosed with severe sleep apnea and they are all sleeping with machines. Recently my 40 year old son was diagnosed. If I were you, I would be really happy to have a doctor who wants to be sure that you will not become a victim of sleep apnea. Maybe you won't die from it now, but over time, if you have it, it will take a serious toll on your body. I went years with undiagnosed severe sleep apnea because I didn't want to sleep with a machine. So I ended up on blood pressure medication in my 30s. I have a lot of serious health issues that I developed over time, including GERD, memory problems, am overweight though I was very thin until I was in my 30s. I am thrilled to be sleeping with a machine now, it feels like a lifeline. But I sure wish I had been brave enough to get the study done when I was much younger or had a doctor who cared enough to suggest a study to prevent the health problems I have now.
Have the study and if you don't have sleep apnea, you can celebrate. If you do, you can find out what to do next on this forum. Believe me, your poor uncle didn't do himself any favors by trying to beat the test. If he is having the problems he says he's having, maybe you will be the one who convinces him to get the help he needs to stop the damage to his body from progressing. There are lots of people here who will help you find you way. I wish you luck and good health.
Grandma


Dad has had a cpap machine for several years now. At least five years that I can remember for sure. Dad has had some weight problems ever since he quit smoking. He is 5 10 and now about 240 instead of the 190-200 he was at for years. I don't know how much the weight matters but I think they were maybe around the same time. He does have mildly high blood pressure he takes medicine for and a diabetic that he can control with diet and no drugs. I am going to take the test and see what happens.

Vicki wrote:It is very common for people with untreated sleep apnea to think that the way they feel is normal. It is not until they are treated that they realize how sick they have been. It is also, very unfortunately, common for people to think that sleep apnea is only about snoring or fatigue. Some of the effects of untreated sleep apnea are below. The ASAA (the sponsors of this forum) provide PAPs for those who have a financial need.

The effects of untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are severe and systemic. Some of them are; increased blood pressure, increased risk of heart attack and stroke (from the constant cycling in and out of hypoxia and increased blood pressure), heart arrhythmias, nocturia (because the increased pressure in the right heart ventricle makes the body think there is too much blood volume so urine is produced), headaches (especially in the morning and probably due to hypoxia), fatigue (duh), memory and concentration problems, weight gain (sleep deprivation causes weight gain for several physiological reasons, one being the alteration of the hormones leptin and ghrelin), apnea induced seizures, there is a link to diabetes, there is a link to GERD, night sweats, depression, anxiety (each apneic event is a true suffocation and elicits the "Fight or Flight" adrenalin response), Fibromyalgia-like symptoms, impotence, decreased libido, relationship and job issues, car accidents, etc.

Vicki


Thanks for helping with my knowledge of sleep apnea. It's not the lack of funds but I am just a frugal person. I just live below my means and have a sizable savings. Don't take this the wrong way but I am not hurting for money. Let someone else use it who needs it. I drive a twelve year old truck. We did just build a new house and decided to have a baby. (Baby girl July 4th)!!!

CraigB wrote:Donald,

I was just like you. My only symptom (or so I thought) was snoring. All the other boxes on the test were left unchecked. I was ready to walk out of there. However, as it turns out, I had high blood pressure caused by Sleep Apnea and a whole host of unseen problems stirring.

With Sleep Apnea, your throat closes up and you stop getting oxygen for and average of 10 to 15 seconds. This make your blood's oxygen levels drop, just a tiny bit. Problem is, when the apnea is bad, you can stop breathing almost once a minute. The less oxygen your blood has, the harder your heart has to work and the more of a strain it is. If it gets very low, some of your other organs can suffer from lack of oxygen as well. Your heart gets use to pumping extra blood to try and accommodate and this causes high blood pressure that carries forward into the rest of the day.

Myself, my blood pressure went from "high enough for medication" to normal or just under normal, in one night.

On top of that, because your body is not getting the chance to drop down into deep sleep (you tend to wake up enough to start breathing again, but not enough to notice you are awake), you miss out on the truly restful sleep. This means your immune system can be compromised and your ability to handle stress can become diminished.

In the end, all the extra stress on your heart and organs can cause failure. Heart attacks and strokes. If you have it, you really do not want to "cheat the test" because then you will never know. You could be doing all sorts of damage to your heart and organs and not even know it. At the very least, if you aren't going to treat the issue, at least find out if you have the issue.


As far as my overall health now the doctor said my lab results were all normal with the exception my cholesterol is a little elevated (the down side of living in the south). Who can pass up fried chicken and fried catfish? I am 5 7 but a little heavy for my height but the doctor said that is more becuase of my physique than being unhealthy. He said my weight is fine for me. I don't have a belly and you can see muscle around my mid section. Still working on my perfect six pack, almost there lol.

I will say I have a friend who is a doctor and was talking to her about it. She said she seriously doubts any way to beat the test since it is following brain waves and respiration. She says if anything, taking something to relax would likely make symptons more prominent since your mouth, throat, etc are relaxed as well. She told me it is fine to take cold medicine but that I may need to reschedule if I actually have a sinus problem at the time. My question is can the test miss your sleep apnea? I am beginning to wonder since the meds wouldn't change the results and my uncle says he thinks he has it. Can you have a good nights sleep that would show normal while others are causing problems?

I had to take the link out Vicki provided because it said I couldn't post links.
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Re: How to pass the sleep test?

Postby Vicki » Fri Mar 02, 2012 2:07 pm

Oops, I spelled the link wrong http://www.sleepapnea.org. You can post links provided that 1) They are not to a commercial website 2) You have several legitimate posts so that we know you are not a spammer.

There is no stereotypical sleep apnea patient. I was a swimmer and runner when I was diagnosed. The possibility of OSA was dismissed for years until I got very ill since I didn’t look like the erroneous stereotype of an apnea patient. We have old and young here (see our pediatric forum), fit and not so, thick and thin and those who don’t even snore.

A sleep study can miss OSA if the person has most events during REM sleep and they never reach that state during the sleep study, which may have happened with your Uncle if he keep waking up because his leads keep coming off. Given the deleterious effects of untreated OSA, your Uncle needs to try a sleep study again.

Vicki
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Friedrich must of had apnea.
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