Dental Problems

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Dental Problems

Postby LauraO » Wed Apr 18, 2012 1:56 pm

I started wearing the CPAP nasal pillows about a year ago but still have trouble using it daily as I just cannot get used to CPAP therapy. Tried the full mask and prefer the pillows but still do not like them either. My main question is if anyone here has troubles with their teeth cracking and pieces falling off their teeth while using CPAP? One by one all my teeth are either cracking or decaying in this past year since I got the CPAP machine. I guess it could be due to dryness and if so, I guess those mouth moisturizers may help? I am using the lowest pressure setting on my machine and am considered to have "mild" apnea.
Just curious if anyone else is having teeth problems or not?
Thanks,
Laura
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Re: Dental Problems

Postby robysue » Wed Apr 18, 2012 3:39 pm

LauraO wrote:My main question is if anyone here has troubles with their teeth cracking and pieces falling off their teeth while using CPAP? One by one all my teeth are either cracking or decaying in this past year since I got the CPAP machine. I guess it could be due to dryness and if so, I guess those mouth moisturizers may help?
Get thee to a dentist!!!! and fast!!!

Mouth dryness can do a real number on the teeth, but not to the point of "teeth cracking and falling into pieces."

My guess is that you're doing some serious night time grinding and clenching (possibly due to the stress of your less than complete CPAP adjustment). And if you're grinding and clenching, the damage is going to get worse not better AND it might wind up involving and damaging your TMJ as well.

So get the teeth checked out by a dentist.

And then start working on addressing the remaining problems with CPAP so that you find yourself under a bit less stress.

Mouth dryness can mean mouth breathing. Since you didn't like the FFM and you'd rather stick with the pillows, you might need to try a chin strap with the nasal mask.

And since your apnea is "mild" and you've given CPAP a year and are still struggling with it, you might also want to ask whether you are a decent candidate for an oral appliance for OSA. But, unfortunately, one criterion for that is "sound teeth and a decent bite" So you may need some dental work before you could try an oral appliance.
current settings Min EPAP = 4, Max IPAP = 8 and Rise time = 3

8/1/2010 sleep study results:
AHI = 3.9 [AHI = (#OA +#CA + #H w/desat) per hour]
RDI = 23.4 [RDI = (#OA +CA + #H w/desat + #H w/arousal) per hour]
Dx: Moderate OSA
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Re: Dental Problems

Postby Grovercald » Wed May 09, 2012 1:10 am

Regular care and prevention of diseases in the mouth are the best possible care you can give your teeth. Detecting problems early on will save a lot of money – it might save your tooth from an extraction or root canal therapy. It is important to visit your dentist at least once, but ideally twice, a year to get your teeth checked and cleaned.
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Re: Dental Problems

Postby Vicki » Wed May 09, 2012 6:10 am

Just to make sure you don't have a misconception, your pressure setting has nothing to do with the severity of your apnea. You can have mild apnea and require a high pressure setting and vice versa.

Vicki
Being defeated is often a temporary condition. Giving up is what makes it permanent.
Marilyn Vos Savant

That which does not kill you makes you stronger-Friedrich Nietzsche
Friedrich must of had apnea.
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Re: Dental Problems

Postby Clay L » Wed May 09, 2012 11:17 am

My dentist recommends Biotene toothpaste for his CPAP using patients. i use it at night and my regular toothpaste in the morning.
I am a mouth breather, use a FFM and have had no decay in 5 1/2 years. That of course is only anecdotal evidence. I have seen no independent studies on the product.
Respironics REMstar AUTO A Flex System One
Pressure = 8 to 11.5
C-Flex = 2

Mirage Quattro FFM
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Re: Dental Problems

Postby a.b.luisi,d.m.d. » Fri May 11, 2012 8:48 pm

robysue wrote:
LauraO wrote:My main question is if anyone here has troubles with their teeth cracking and pieces falling off their teeth while using CPAP? One by one all my teeth are either cracking or decaying in this past year since I got the CPAP machine. I guess it could be due to dryness and if so, I guess those mouth moisturizers may help?
Get thee to a dentist!!!! and fast!!!

Mouth dryness can do a real number on the teeth, but not to the point of "teeth cracking and falling into pieces."

My guess is that you're doing some serious night time grinding and clenching (possibly due to the stress of your less than complete CPAP adjustment). And if you're grinding and clenching, the damage is going to get worse not better AND it might wind up involving and damaging your TMJ as well.

So get the teeth checked out by a dentist.

And then start working on addressing the remaining problems with CPAP so that you find yourself under a bit less stress.

Mouth dryness can mean mouth breathing. Since you didn't like the FFM and you'd rather stick with the pillows, you might need to try a chin strap with the nasal mask.

And since your apnea is "mild" and you've given CPAP a year and are still struggling with it, you might also want to ask whether you are a decent candidate for an oral appliance for OSA. But, unfortunately, one criterion for that is "sound teeth and a decent bite" So you may need some dental work before you could try an oral appliance.

I am a dentist working in dental sleep medicine. I just want to confirm that robysue has covered all the bases with this post. It is excellent.
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