Sleep Apnea - Memory Loss and Recovery

This area is for Sleep Apnea questions and general Sleep Apnea Discussions.


Sleep Apnea - Memory Loss and Recovery

Postby SleepSI » Thu Aug 23, 2007 12:22 am

Hi,

My sleep doc. suggests that my reported short term memory impairment may well be related to my severe obstructive sleep apnea (AHI = 76 untreated) and that with effective treatment my memory will improve significantly over time. My immediate concern is that my current titrated CPAP is not especially effective; my AHI = 32 with titrated CPAP.

Now, I've found 1 sleep study on line suggesting that short term memory does improve with effective CPAP therapy over time (e.g. 6 hrs. effective CPAP per night for 3 months). (However, this study may not apply to me given my high AHI with CPAP.)

Does anyone have any testimonials or articles to share on how CPAP usage has improved short term memory (e.g. How long after starting CPAP was memory improvement noted? How many hours per night of CPAP? What were the AHI levels with CPAP? How much improvement approximately)?

Thanks!
SleepSI
 

Re: Sleep Apnea - Memory Loss and Recovery

Postby Daniel » Thu Aug 23, 2007 3:49 am

My sleep doc. suggests that my reported short term memory impairment may well be related to my severe obstructive sleep apnea (AHI = 76 untreated) and that with effective treatment my memory will improve significantly over time. My immediate concern is that my current titrated CPAP is not especially effective; my AHI = 32 with titrated CPAP.


Memory improvement depends on the actual damage done in the first instance. Compliant CPAP usage usually does help to improve things OK. You have a problem with CPAP if your AHI remains at 32. Effective CPAP should have your AHI below 5. At 32 you still have severe OSA.

As you can tell what your AHI is, I assume that you have a cpap machine with a data card and software to read it ? Are you using straight CPAP or APAP ? In some cases (quite a few) APAP does not clear all apnoea events. If using straight CPAP, does your machine tell you anything about compliance ? Any data on mask leakage ? I think that these may be your problem.

Now, I've found 1 sleep study on line suggesting that short term memory does improve with effective CPAP therapy over time (e.g. 6 hrs. effective CPAP per night for 3 months). (However, this study may not apply to me given my high AHI with CPAP.)


As stated your CPAP therapy is not working correctly.

Does anyone have any testimonials or articles to share on how CPAP usage has improved short term memory (e.g. How long after starting CPAP was memory improvement noted? How many hours per night of CPAP? What were the AHI levels with CPAP? How much improvement approximately)?


Everyone is different. A lot depends on just how long your memory has been effected by untreated apnoea. Some people get results quicker than others.

Post back some more detail.

Daniel.
The untreated Sleep Apnoea sufferer died quietly in his sleep..
Unlike his three passengers who died screaming !


The first 40 years of childhood are by far the hardest
Daniel
 
Posts: 6006
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:49 am
Location: Ireland
Machine: Philips Respironics System One Auto
Mask: ResMed Micro Nasal Mask
Humidifier: No
Year Diagnosed: 1993

Thanks for the feedback

Postby SleepSI » Fri Aug 24, 2007 3:51 am

Thanks for the comments and follow-up questions.

I'm using straight CPAP - 12 mm H20. Limiting pressures was the appearance of post arousal central apneas. BIPAP was tried with marginally poorer results (i.e. a few more central apneas than CPAP by 12 mm). APAP was never tried.

My machine has a memory card recording first-order compliance only (e.g. how often and for how long I use the unit). Minor leaks are not recorded however.

Your comments regarding possible leaks are interesting. I have been told in the past that I tend to "mouth breath" and my mask is of the pillow only type. Hence, it could be possible that I'm mouth breathing while "asleep" defeating somewhat my CPAP. Yet, I notice that when I try opening my mouth under CPAP that the sensation is most unpleasant and I would be somewhat surprised if that action while sleeping didn't fully awaken me. Further, I note no excess mouth dryness in the morning (and why wouldn't the lab tech. have noted "mouth breathing" during CPAP titration?). Still it's worth looking into. Perhaps I might try a chin strap or a full mask as a check. (As asides, I do notice under CPAP when still awake that I tend to want to move my lower jaw forward. Perhaps a full mask or dental appliance is suggested. I also experience with CPAP vivid dreams - awakening 2x nightly (REM rebound?).)

The sleep doc. hasn't reviewed my results with me yet. She has only sent me a report and ordered my hardware. I've been only on my CPAP machine now for 7 nights. I'll certainly bring up concerns w.r.t. my present titrated CPAP of 32 when I see her in October. I need to keep trying - I also have Type 2 diabetis. I suspect that I've had OSA most of my adult life - 30+ years. On the positive side, since starting CPAP I do feel more alert during the day and calmer and believe my short term memory has started to improve a little (hopefully not all a placebo effect).

Thanks again. Suggestions welcome.
SleepSI
 

Re: Thanks for the feedback

Postby Daniel » Fri Aug 24, 2007 10:29 am

I'm using straight CPAP - 12 mm H20. Limiting pressures was the appearance of post arousal central apneas. BIPAP was tried with marginally poorer results (i.e. a few more central apneas than CPAP by 12 mm). APAP was never tried.


Pressure is actually measured in Centimetres H20. I think you need a copy of your sleep study report, also the titration report. The introduction of Centrals needs to be addressed.

My machine has a memory card recording first-order compliance only (e.g. how often and for how long I use the unit). Minor leaks are not recorded however.

Your comments regarding possible leaks are interesting. I have been told in the past that I tend to "mouth breath" and my mask is of the pillow only type. Hence, it could be possible that I'm mouth breathing while "asleep" defeating somewhat my CPAP. Yet, I notice that when I try opening my mouth under CPAP that the sensation is most unpleasant and I would be somewhat surprised if that action while sleeping didn't fully awaken me. Further, I note no excess mouth dryness in the morning (and why wouldn't the lab tech. have noted "mouth breathing" during CPAP titration?). Still it's worth looking into. Perhaps I might try a chin strap or a full mask as a check. (As asides, I do notice under CPAP when still awake that I tend to want to move my lower jaw forward. Perhaps a full mask or dental appliance is suggested. I also experience with CPAP vivid dreams - awakening 2x nightly (REM rebound?).)


I think your mouth breathing might be the problem. Nasal Pillows and mouth breathers are not good bed fellows. You mentioned a 'limiting pressure'.....is that a pressure reduction ? If so there may not be enough pressure to keep the airway open.............hence the high AHI. Again, Centrals...........must be addressed.

The sleep doc. hasn't reviewed my results with me yet. She has only sent me a report and ordered my hardware. I've been only on my CPAP machine now for 7 nights. I'll certainly bring up concerns w.r.t. my present titrated CPAP of 32 when I see her in October. I need to keep trying - I also have Type 2 diabetis. I suspect that I've had OSA most of my adult life - 30+ years. On the positive side, since starting CPAP I do feel more alert during the day and calmer and believe my short term memory has started to improve a little (hopefully not all a placebo effect).


Try and get an earlier appointment. She should not be letting you hang in limbo.
Type 2 diabetes is a common side effect of untreated apnoea.
The fact that you are seeing improvements is good.........in truth probably the best gauge of how things are going. Not calling your competency into question.........but is your reading of the AHI of 32 correct..........maybe its 32 events during the night (total), rather than the hourly average...........promise not to laugh if that is the case :lol: If it does represent the total number of events, and say you sleep for 7 hours, then your AHI would be below 5, which is considered 'normal'.

Your reported improvements indicate a certain amount of 'success' with cpap........so just maybe your reading might be incorrect. If this is the case you may not need to see your sleep doctor as quickly as earlier advised.

Best of luck.

Daniel.

Thanks again. Suggestions welcome.[/quote]
The untreated Sleep Apnoea sufferer died quietly in his sleep..
Unlike his three passengers who died screaming !


The first 40 years of childhood are by far the hardest
Daniel
 
Posts: 6006
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:49 am
Location: Ireland
Machine: Philips Respironics System One Auto
Mask: ResMed Micro Nasal Mask
Humidifier: No
Year Diagnosed: 1993

RE:RE: Thanks for the feedback

Postby SleepSI » Fri Aug 24, 2007 1:48 pm

Thanks for the comments.

I have both my initial diagnostic and CPAP titration reports. My sleep doc. has explained my initial diagnostic test results to me. Unfortunately, despite calling in for an earlier appointment to obtain an explanation of the CPAP titration report and a plan forward, the earliest I can get in is Oct. 12 due to heavy booking for the doctor. There are other centers I could try for an earlier appointment but then I run into insurance and continuity issues.

Yes you're right - the report states 12 cm of H20 pressure was optimum not 12 mm of H20 as I incorrectly typed. However, w.r.t. arousal events at the "optimized", recommended CPAP pressure of 12 cm of H20, the titration report states: "The overall AHI was 32 events per hour of sleep (a combination of obstructive and post arousal central apneas)". Hence, I still have severe apnea overall even with "optimized" CPAP in the sense that my AHI > 30 at an "optimum" CPAP pressure. As to a "limiting CPAP pressure", the titration report states that at pressures > 12 cm the number of central apneas increased significantly and the "best" overal AHI result (i.e. a combination of obstructive and central apneas) occurs at 12 cm.

As to soft lab evidence as to why I feel better with CPAP notwithstanding a high treated CPAP AHI = 32, this is a marked improvement over my untreated CPAP of 76. Further, the % time I spend in each sleep phase is approaching a more typical distribution. For example, untreated I spent only 8.1% in REM vs. 17.5% treated. Additionally, the lab results show far more arousal events when I'm sleeping supine as opposed to on my side and during the lab titration I spent approximately 3/4's of the time supine; where-as, at home, I'm defintely sleeping on my side most of the time (which should reduce my arousals).

In closing, I still need a better understanding of my titrated results overall, particularly the central apneas, and a plan to address my high CPAP AHI. While I wait for my doctor's appointment, I will try a full face mask and see if this improves my sense of well being. Although I feel better so far with the CPAP, I still have significant residual problems secondary to my sleep disorder that hopefully can be resolved better.

Thanks.
SleepSI
 



  • Site Supporter

  • Similar topics
    Replies
    Views
    Author

Return to SLEEP APNEA HELP!

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: cbcwbdbvs, cenmntuiw, cktwovfrk, elxxpmqxd, etxeiryjy, expbibczh, gfpmllvgt, gjabhnzm, gjasvyii, gjbsosmg, gjbvnonq, gjcyetxo, gjdnkypzt, gjecjavm, gjexldum, gjfbjepz, gjgkypgf, gjglngqfx, gjhbxdzy, gjhvijar, gjiciwlg, gjnlmcjq, gjplxybh, gjpqtxoz, gjpxtqtu, gjqgtbzf, gjrjjuah, gjrlarwz, gjsbqjvq, gjstmajg, gjtfaigc, gjvjmalw, gjwhmzme, gjwobbdc, gjxdmzcm, gjxzeldls, gjyceokq, gjzughsk, Google [Bot], guwdjbljb, hnbxqbntx, htehkspqf, ijrxetycp, jcbxaamkv, jozivrqjx, kduskdabh, kwnctutsf, lyxljjidm, ofkltbscq, pdlunaraq, pmjgrornx, qhihrrbne, quwpuhcfd, rlnajkdzq, rnzupcfmf, sdpayedfd, ttuzwlbnr, tvphhlmdc, xqvnswgvm and 6 guests